David A. Mellis

David A. Mellis is a PhD student in the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab. He has a master's in interaction design from the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea (Italy) and taught at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (Denmark). David is one of the creators of Arduino, an open-source hardware and software platform for electronic prototyping.

Email: mellis@media.mit.edu. Twitter: @mellis.
Photos: flickr/mellis. Code: github/damellis.

CV: David Mellis

Research
Do-It-Yourself Devices
Physical Computing
Open-Source Hardware
Digital Fabrication
Teaching

Design for DIY Manufacturing In this semester-long graduate studio course, students designed and fabricated custom electronic devices. (MIT Media Lab, Spring 2012)

Arduino & Physical Computing I've taught a variety of Arduino-based workshops, including a sci-fi inspired course at MIT and RISD, a one-week intensive at the CIID Summer School, an e-textile workshop at Columbia College, and more.

Research

Do-It-Yourself Devices

Explorations into the personal fabrication of electronic devices, including designing for individual production and variation.

Novice Design of Interactive Products

Introducing novices to circuit board design and production through the creation of relevant examples, activities, and other resources. Seeks to demystify the methods by which electronic products are created and to stimulate reflection on how more people might get involved in that process.

DIY Cellphone: exploring the limits of DIY electronics

An exploration into the possibilities for individual construction and customization of the most ubiquitous of electronic devices, the cellphone. We investigate the implications of digital fabrication and open-source hardware for DIY practice. Research questions include:

David A. Mellis & Leah Buechley. 2014. Do-It-Yourself Cellphones: An Investigation into the Possibilities and Limits of High-Tech DIY. In Proceedings of the 32nd annual ACM conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '14).

Cellphone Module

A module for exploring custom cellphone form factors and interfaces. Contains the essential components for (GSM) cellular connectivity and an Arduino-compatible microcontroller. Powered from a LiPo battery.

 

Master's Thesis
Case studies in the digital fabrication of open-source consumer electronic products.

 
Digital fabrication allows us to treat the designs of products as a kind of source code: files that can be freely shared, modified, and produced. These case studies combine traditional electronic circuit boards and components (a mature digital fabrication process) with laser-cut or 3D printed materials. They demonstrate multiple possibilities for individual customizations both pre- and post-fabrication, as well as a variety of potential production and distribution processes and scales.

David A. Mellis, Case Studies in the Digital Fabrication of Open-Source Consumer Electronic Products, Master's Thesis, MIT.

David A. Mellis and Leah Buechley. 2012. Case studies in the personal fabrication of electronic products. In Proceedings of the Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS '12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 268-277.

David A. Mellis, Dana Gordon, and Leah Buechley. 2011. Fab FM: the design, making, and modification of an open-source electronic product. In Proceedings of the fifth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction (TEI '11).

Thesis Blog >>

Additional Publications

David A. Mellis, "Do-It-Yourself Fabrication of Electronic Devices", IEEE Pervasive Computing, vol.13, no. 3, pp. 22-29, July-Sept. 2014.

Morgan G. Ames, Jeffrey Bardzell, Shaowen Bardzell, Silvia Lindtner, David A. Mellis, and Daniela K. Rosner. 2014. Making cultures: empowerment, participation, and democracy - or not?. In Proceedings of the extended abstracts of the 32nd annual ACM conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '14).

David A. Mellis. 2013. Do-it-yourself electronic products and the people who make them. In Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI '13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 357-358.

Physical Computing

Tools and techniques for working with microcontrollers and electronics – and for integrating them with craft materials and practices.

Support for programming ATtiny microcontrollers with Arduino. (more)

Library for simple playback of audio samples with Arduino. (more)

TinyProgrammer: an easy-to-use circuit board for programming low-cost microcontrollers (more)

FabISP: a DIY circuit for programming microcontrollers. (more)

David A. Mellis, Sam Jacoby, Leah Buechley, Hannah Perner-Wilson, and Jie Qi. 2013. Microcontrollers as material: crafting circuits with paper, conductive ink, electronic components, and an "untoolkit". In Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI '13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 83-90.

Leah Buechley, David Mellis, Hannah Perner-Wilson, Emily Lovell, and Bonifaz Kaufmann. Living wall: programmable wallpaper for interactive spaces. In Proceedings of the international conference on Multimedia (MM '10).

Eric Rosenbaum, Evelyn Eastmond, and David Mellis. 2010. Empowering programmability for tangibles. In Proceedings of the fourth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction (TEI '10).

Mellis, D. A., Banzi, M., Cuartielles, D., and Igoe, T. 2007. Arduino: An open electronics prototyping platform. In Proceedings of the Conference on Human Factors in Computing (alt.chi) (CHI’07). ACM, New York.

Co-Founder: Arduino electronics prototyping platform

Open-Source Hardware

Sharing design files for others to make and modify yields diverse ecosystems and opportunities for creativity.

David Mellis and Leah Buechley. 2012. Collaboration in open-source hardware: third-party variations on the arduino duemilanove. In Proceedings of the ACM 2012 conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW '12).

David A. Mellis and Leah Buechley. 2011. Scaffolding Creativity with Open-Source Hardware. In Proceedings of the eighth internal conference on Creativity and Cognition 2011 (C&C '11).

Board Member: Open-Source Hardware Association

Digital Fabrication

Lego Designer: computationally generated, vinyl-cut decals for decorating Lego bricks (more)

Modular, laser-cut, press-fit wooden toy cars (more)

David Mellis, Sean Follmer, Björn Hartmann, Leah Buechley, and Mark D. Gross. 2013. FAB at CHI: digital fabrication tools, design, and community. In CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA '13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 3307-3310.

Class Work:
3D Design for Rapid Prototyping and Rendering
How To Make (Almost) Anything